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The Art of War

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  • The Art of War

    Seeping through the morning dew
    The crimson dye could not but stain
    A thousand blades of faithful grass
    Which bent and broke beneath the slain.

    This graveyard was a battlefield
    Where Chaos reigned, and Fear was Lord.
    The pallet was New Orleans soil,
    The paintbrush was a sanguine sword.

    Their canvas was a freedom flag
    A timeless mark of liberty
    A badge which fueled their brave assault
    But left them dead instead of free.

    Though littered with the hue of death
    Were red and blue and righteous white
    Cheers of victory would veil
    The horrors of a needless fight

    The British called a yield; but for
    The wasted lives of loyal men
    News of triumph came too late-
    The painters would not paint again.
    Last edited by bethanyaryan; 02-07-2015, 06:37 AM.

  • #2
    a picture painted with the same materials your mind paints a memory couldn't be more expressive of a portraited thought. Wow!

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    • #3
      "Copper sword" is historically inaccurate, but it's well done and you've captured some of the senselessness of war.

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      • #4

        Thank you guys! The idea was definitely to that effect- “the senselessness of war,” but it was also literally a needless battle. The war was already over when it was fought, but word didn't reach the field until the lives had already been lost. About the word, “copper”- when I wrote this, I was not referring to the material with which any swords that were used would have been made, (which consisted mostly of iron,) but to the sword's color. I believe the iron underneath of bloodstain would have resulted in a copper hue, and since the poem intertwines the nature of war with art, I decided to use this adjective to describe the sword. Thanks for your input!

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      • #5
        Well but for a great Johnny Horton song, I might agree. The real irony in the story is what Jackson ended up doing to the Cheeoke. A good poem, I love one with a little history.

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        • #6
          Thank you for the idea- I think I'll use it- as long as I keep the rights to the poem :P

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          • D.F.Russell
            D.F.Russell commented
            Editing a comment
            I hereby relinquish any claims to "The Art of War" written bethanyaryan.

        • #7
          Brilliant! No doubt. So, so visual, kid.

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          • #8
            Thanks rhymarhyma

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            • #9
              And thanks D.F. Russell.

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              • D.F.Russell
                D.F.Russell commented
                Editing a comment
                You are quite welcome.
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