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"The substance in Horror"

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  • "The substance in Horror"

    When I watched the movie The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, it was a night I stayed up until the sun came out. My sister and her friends were hanging out at my house for the night, and decided to watch it.
    It was perfect; the otherworldly feeling of detachedness, as they walked toward the so-empty-seeming house, the whole stark atmosphere kicked in the adrenaline, nailed down the fact and living reality of the movie ... "Based on true events".
    Everything seems washed with blue loneliness, when they escape from the house and the killers living there, and the picture of them coming to the highway, those cars which seem from another world.
    It must be so close to something deep within us; it claws, evokes, tugs, plays with us ... it's flies flapping to a murder ... a lonely kiss of piercing light, from a dark closet--nowhere--and you're cold and you feel far away.
    Horror is in our blood, and in how time moves through us, rhythms of being human, and life being lived under these tides. When the sun starts to go down, I feel fear. I'm not sure. In some senses I have read that the color--particularly red--is actually leaving the sky, bit by bit. So it becomes so red. How those fields are in that movie, endless corn to get lost in, hedging in the house filled with the psychopaths. How it's so much like real life ... I sat there terrified, transfixed. The blue light bled on me from the TV as my eyes adjusted to changes in darkness as I watched. The screen was small--this was a long time ago, the TVs were different, and likely it was a VHS.
    Those hyper-colored midnights, they are like holidays, where my hyped up body adjusts to the changing levels of chemicals, and rebounds again with a recomeuppance.
    I've never thought about losing them. Horror makes you think of only the barest essentials--you're imagining death's spirit. We black-out and our drives kick in full gear: a fight for survival: that is real, feels real. Often we change our minds, often we're changed forever by tragedy, horror, sorrow-- natural human reactions to seeing the animal within, and what we're capable of doing to each other. Sometimes, some things we never forget.
    You have the people who love the taste of fear: Who sense it running along beneath the surface, playing beneath cruel music, crueller to their joy, who would sing to bewilderment whom they could capture by tantalizing. It's a cortisol cocktail--it's wanting to get away at all costs from a stab wound. Pleading for your life not to die.
    Horror wakes us up to life, and shapes reality by showing extremes of human behavior--you find the scene of kids and they're looking for fun for a weekend, or something similar; they're lost.
    Stupid, and easy to kill, the kids don't get to see their happy ending, and all to our amusement. Horror shows a sick part of us which delights in the carnality and sadomasochistic nature--psychopathy mixed with diseased tendencies. And we film it and watch it so that we can encapsulate it, and idealize into a shape all our fear, and dreams and hopes, and our reason for being.
    Sort of a worshipping.
    Last edited by amenOra; 09-05-2018, 04:01 PM.

  • #2
    I venture to say that people who commit such atrocities have detachment issues, lack empathy are narcissistic in nature and sadistic. All people have inappropriate thoughts but most don’t act on them. I tried to watch that movie but could not - yes bad news grips the headlines but we don’t have to feed our minds with it.
    Last edited by AlexandratheLate; 09-05-2018, 04:34 PM.

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    • amenOra
      amenOra commented
      Editing a comment
      I definitely agree. I am not sure how well I blent that relationship between how horror is used in movies, etc, and the mindset of an actual killer. An interesting relationship which I definitely feel it would take some courage to explore. I find that fascinating, is all.
      No meaning to be callous about horror that we suffer from. I write about that in other ways, as well.

    • amenOra
      amenOra commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you vm for your comment, I appreciate your reading my works, perhaps seeing past the outside exterior which I put as grit, I guess, to explain how I see life.

  • #3
    I'm not even sure if I've seen the whole movie from start to finish! It was memorable nonetheless.

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    • #4
      amenOra, like that other recent prose piece you shared, this is really engaging work. You have such a talent for capturing a phase of your past and reflecting on it in a way that is insightful and enjoyably readable. I like the way you evoke a time and setting and then turn it like when one examines a gem or curio. Great stuff!!

      Comment


      • amenOra
        amenOra commented
        Editing a comment
        it becomes 'capture the relation in the moment' and so works for me well, i think, and still this may be missing something. the end I was a bit amiss about. Anyway... just brushing up on different 'facets' as you might see Thanks so much!
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