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Dealt the alchemical hand

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  • Dealt the alchemical hand

    Deleted
    Last edited by grant hayes; 12-25-2017, 10:54 PM.

  • #2
    the 'dark' here, familiar Alchemy, bearing the heaviness, ... wounded lightning is interesting, very beautiful. Intense and still. Thanks for sharing!

    Comment


    • grant hayes
      grant hayes commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you for reading, amenOra!

  • #3
    This speaks to me of the rise and fall of men. Very vivid and with intensity and brevity.

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    • grant hayes
      grant hayes commented
      Editing a comment
      There is definitely that angle in it, Alexandra; I am glad this speaks to you thus.

  • #4
    I find this intense yet I don't understand it all and would love your insight to help my learning.

    Comment


    • grant hayes
      grant hayes commented
      Editing a comment
      To find it 'intense' is sufficient, mooneyblack. There is no prescriptive 'meaning' for this piece; in a way, it is its structure. I am happy to elucidate that, but I prefer further interpretation to occur free of any interference from me. amenOra has done a good job of engaging with the imagery and metaphors of the piece. I will give some pointers below.

  • #5
    i'll take a stab as to it's meaning...

    stanza one might be about "high" e.g. royalty ... miscommunications.

    the raising of the (quarter sun) in an image of the sublime: divine meeting human.

    stanza 3 is somewhat the dawning,
    breathtaking description about matter battling spirit...
    and the inanimate matter, non-mud, like a newborn, blind, untitled. the mud prevails?--
    red symbolizes matter, white symbolizes spirit, I believe.


    the drum seems to be about time; sequences of things. syncopation... wounded lightning feels to me very elemental, and has to do with pairing of light and sound. Wounded sound ... after the strike of brilliant lightning. what is missing then, I ask myself.

    ...

    the end stanza submits an end, quite normal in the animal kingdom. almost like the day coming into focus, and seeing things, ... it's normal and natural, "plunder", of spirit. It is a given that we all suffer. And it's a nice, wound down ending, where the natural order of things is reinstated.

    the plunder is the flesh, right?

    Comment


    • grant hayes
      grant hayes commented
      Editing a comment
      Better than a 'stab', amenOra. That you have taken the time to share your impressions is most appreciated. As usual, your interaction with the piece is alert and fruitful; you have an affinity for the symbolic resonance of words and images. Your interpretation is coherent and subtle and entirely apt. Thank you for your attentive reading!

  • #6
    True to form Grant always intriguing. I get the subliminal sum of the third lines. Though I might disagree with amenOra a bit.

    Comment


    • grant hayes
      grant hayes commented
      Editing a comment
      I don't mind being intriguing, divot; I'll take it as a benediction. Disagreeing over a piece like this is par for the course, of course ☺

  • #7
    Hello grant, What an achievement, to have given yourself so many parameters and to toil within and with so few words (drove you mad, I dare say) to produce a poem of this stature is most admirable, indeed. I actually got it straight away, in my own way, that is; on the surface, I dare not surgically analyse for fear of snipping the poetry Let there be light, and the light and blood of the many storms to follow. You write like a caved monk, dealt the hand of life, read them and weep, as it were and from that which wept - reap. Excellent by Jove! Fond regards, Tony.

    Comment


    • grant hayes
      grant hayes commented
      Editing a comment
      Getting it straight away in your own way is the best way, Tony As for madness, I am already there. I hear you about refraining from a too-deep surgery, yet your remarks show that you have plumbed the fathoms anyway. Many thanks for your kind appraisal.

  • #8
    My previous comments seem to have disappeared.

    This is a master course in lexical precision, as is all your work.

    I interpreted this as a commentary on nature as the great equalizer, which humbles the mighty and the lowly alike.

    Having read your explanation, I now see how far off I was.

    Nevertheless, when I interpret in that light, it grips me even more!


    Comment


    • #9
      Your initial interpretation is not 'far off' at all, Dwayne; as I remarked above, this piece does not prescribe a single, canonical meaning. The explanation I've given may inform an interested reader about my construction process, and the catalyst for writing, but it is not meant to be the last word. There is definitely a levelling that emerges in this piece.

      Comment


      • #10
        The precision of the structure, coupled with the alchemical leanings, left me feeling quite outpaced. Even now, reading the comments on a cell phone screen, I sense I'm inadequate to full appreciation. I hope when I'm back to home base and regular monitor size, I can return for another look.

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