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Nine & Eleven

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  • Nine & Eleven

    Deleted
    Last edited by grant hayes; 12-25-2017, 05:02 PM.

  • #2
    You have been extremely open minded to post on some of my rhymes - not poems. You write poetry - and as I have posted before - I understand none of it? I am way out of my league here but grateful their are some who humor me. Thanks to you for reading my silly rhymes.

    Comment


    • BobGrantKC
      BobGrantKC commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you - I did not know this could be done?

    • grant hayes
      grant hayes commented
      Editing a comment
      Bob, poetry is a wide field in which rhymes like yours have a long held place. I've seen your work grow in charm, bite, and delight, and I would hope you keep pursuing your unique gift. As for what I write, it can be a bit hit-and-miss, however I feel that my material has improved markedly during the time I've posted on this site. It's not everyone's cup of tea, but that's fine.

    • BobGrantKC
      BobGrantKC commented
      Editing a comment
      I will be 72 soon. Before I turned 70 - my strategy began with saying/writing the new age a couple of months before the actual date. That way - it was not such a shock when the birthday actually arrived. I have been half way looking for something I could do - from a home base - to earn a little extra income. For the few opportunities that have interested me - the option years (where you have to put in your birthday) - do not go back to 1945. There is probably a rhyme in there somewhat? I truly appreciate your comment. I guess that I will keep posting when something silly - or otherwise - pops into my head. Hopefully, as I get older and older - the rhymes don't become even more gibberish in terms of what pure poetry should be?

  • #3
    September Eleventh 2001 -- Now 6 years later. Edit: My poor math skills ; it is 16 years. Of course!
    Makes me think of .. the first stanza-- How after the towers fall things might've grown in the place, host and "mother" to birds, all of it having witnessed in one way or another The entire Tragedy.

    9 lines in the first stanza
    11 in the next, and last.

    Better anyway that it be kept to "his" killing boys. Right, non-descript. This piece doesn't worry or tarry with any "paranoia" or whatever that could come. A good remembrance of the event.

    I wrote a while back, half-for a poetry class....

    Can't find the specific poem, but it ended with,

    Ash wanders lost
    Down crying streets ofNew York.

    And began with something like,

    Eleven firemen hold up
    The Twelvth.

    Thank you for the tribute, it is something to Remember, and I am sure there's more to glean from this piece, later reading.

    Kudos--
    Last edited by amenOra; 09-11-2017, 01:35 PM.

    Comment


    • grant hayes
      grant hayes commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you for engaging with this very terse piece, amenOra. I originally posted it on 9/11 last year; in reposting it now, I suppose I wanted people like yourself who weren't on RhymeZone back then to be able to see it. Sometimes it seems to me too hard, dense, and cold; other times it seems as light and hot as a cinder. It's interesting to find out what others may think of it.

  • #4

    skyline sermon.
    The lust that lies
    itself divine
    lay its touchstone
    in that city’s
    human cinders.

    Grant, I found this very poingnant and isn't true that most human inflicted tragedy is inspired by lust/greed at the expense of human life or cinders. I would hope that we would learn from our history but most cities are built from human blood.

    Comment


    • grant hayes
      grant hayes commented
      Editing a comment
      They are so built, indeed, Alexandra, and that is the seed of a poem, for sure.
      I suspect that a suppressed lust, transmuted by certain religious dogmas into a perennial sense of grievance, feeds this kind of horror.

  • #5
    This is what poetry can be, when crafted by a Master Poet!

    There are many that say little, with much,

    and few that speak profoundly in brevity.

    You sir, are certainly the latter.

    This struck to the core of what ill men conceive from pulpits of their discontent.

    Comment


    • grant hayes
      grant hayes commented
      Editing a comment
      'Pulpits of their discontent' is a wonderfully apt phrase, Dwayne.

      I wanted to respond to the event in a way that wasn't undermined by my physical distance from it. I cannot speak from personal experience, or simply lament what I witnessed on TV. That leaves me 'the big picture'. The danger there, of course, is pontification. With all that in view, brevity is virtually demanded.

  • #6
    Outstanding! Hats off - and strewth combined. This is wonderful.

    Comment


    • grant hayes
      grant hayes commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you, Rhymist. I am a bit surprised - albeit pleasantly - you find it that praiseworthy.

  • #7
    What words describe

    Where hate abides

    Between the creases

    Folds in time

    What’s not forgiven

    Yours or mine

    Went to bed with heroes

    Never forget

    Great writing Grant

    Comment


    • grant hayes
      grant hayes commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you, divot, both for your compliment and your responsive verse, which is most apt and insightful.
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