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  • grant hayes
    replied
    I feel satisfied with this brief piece, Tony; it captures without fuss what I saw and felt. I appreciate your Darwin reference, and I am glad you have enjoyed the poem so much. Many thanks for the praise.

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  • Tony Grannell
    replied
    Hello grant, 'rockshelf jammed with shards', reminded me of the Wailing Wall, jammed with a history of paper wishes and hopes. The poem in its entirety is perhaps how Charles Darwin might have dreamed when in slumber. How you put one's mind's eye into poetry is astounding and always beautiful. Thank you very much for this one, I have enjoyed it immensely. Regards, Tony.

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  • The second
    replied
    I have been infected many times by the oyster shard but the child that has fallen is a victim of clumsy innocence and we have all been children. forgive me now as i am no longer a child or innocent but i have fallen and no pearls are worth the ravage. Thank YOU

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  • grant hayes
    replied
    There are many oyster beds near where this piece is set, the second; the ragged, salt-searing slash of an oyster shell is a pain I know. It is preferable by far to pains of the soul. Blessings on your poetic soul, the second.

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  • The second
    replied
    Grant this was like falling into an oyster bed with bare feet I know im alive because i feel the pain and the horizons will not outlast the sun Dido poet Bravo many times folded

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  • rhymetime
    commented on 's reply
    Thank you sir

  • grant hayes
    commented on 's reply
    As usual, rhymetime, you grasp meaning with a sure touch!

  • rhymetime
    replied
    Eloquence as only your mind can conceive it and your pen present it. I can see you sitting on a rocky ocean cliff absorbing the solitude. You notice the shell, you think of all that has transpired to bring you together. Then you realize that in years hence you will be the shell cast upon another poet's shore. And so it goes
    Well that's my thought

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  • grant hayes
    replied
    Hi Suz-zen. The title typically comes last, for me, and is often simply a phrase from the piece itself. No need to apologize; life happens. This particular piece arrived pretty much fully formed, shortly after I had left the waterside and was walking home.

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  • Suz-zen
    replied
    grant hayes apologize for being absent and missing this most impressive piece of writing. I will come back to this and read again as I do with so many of your poems. This one speaks to me at a deep level. The Title had me unsure of where I was being taken...Question: do you have a title first or after you write a poem? LOVE this !!

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  • grant hayes
    replied
    That is a lovely compliment, lunar glide. That you thus appraise my offerings brings me joy.

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  • lunar glide
    replied
    you write beautifully about what haunts us. as if with special insight from the divine watchmakers...

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  • DWAYNE
    commented on 's reply
    I say, risk it! It is the splash of color to the canvas.

    One can always step back, but in your case, ALWAYS RISK IT!

    No bathos here!

  • RhymeLovingWriter
    commented on 's reply
    I hear what you are saying, but the descriptor 'flatly' made me stop and read again. If it was so in the approach or observance, all subject matter acquires dimension under your skillful pen.

  • N. Y. Sonnet
    commented on 's reply
    'Twould be a sorry day indeed if you were to cease! I trust that, if such a day were to come, it lies far in the future.
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