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Malcolm, the Pirate Muse, Returns with Penelope, Smithy Wife, in Tow (Part III)

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  • Malcolm, the Pirate Muse, Returns with Penelope, Smithy Wife, in Tow (Part III)

    Whether you've time to read this or not (although of course I hope you do or else why would I post?) - I hope it brings a smile. It brought a smile to me to write it - that I wish to pass along.

    For those newer to the zone (or if you're gray cells have slowed down a bit as mine have), here are links to Parts I & II. This one is a continuation of those.

    Part I Lighthearted Limerick Lover’s Plea to Writers
    Part II Long-Locked Pirate Muse


    Malcolm, the Pirate Muse, Returns with Penelope, Smithy Wife, in Tow

    St. Patrick’s will soon be arriving.
    We’re green with shamrock-ish conniving.
    We’ve wielded our herds
    of prosaic words
    to carve out poetic surviving.

    Yet often we bards can do better
    than tittle and jot every letter;
    creating the curves
    influencing nerves
    of readers and other go-getters.

    Perhaps we should turn to the braggarts
    who prior to this were no laggards.
    They teased with delight
    but bore us no spite,
    the pirate and smithy, those swaggarts!

    Do you recall Malcolm, the scurvish?
    Who took away words (very nervish)!
    He went and got hitched,
    then he (and she) ditched
    the Rhymezone – and whirled out as dervish.

    They rollicked the seas for a treasure
    beyond any heretofore measured.
    Their find may surprise
    those ears and those eyes
    which pine for a chance at word pleasure.

    This Malcolm-Penelope pairing
    discovered some tidbits for sharing.
    So pull up a seat
    and hoist up your feet
    (and bottle), perusal preparing.

    They first made their way to Fusaka;
    discovered traditional waka.
    It’s not quite haiku,
    or heartfelt senryu,
    but tanka (to knock off your socks-a).

    Though waka were mostly for lovers,
    our pirate pair soon would discover
    it holds many forms,
    (though tanka’s the norm
    about which the current style hovers).

    They sailed, feeling tranquilly ready
    to visit the land of spaghetti.
    With musical flare
    the ballata there
    held dozens of syllables heady.

    This form isn’t now-a-days written
    unless by some ancient bug bitten.
    If you resurrect
    this form I suspect
    that with it you’re probably smitten.

    Then off once again, they carousing,
    on waves that allowed little drowsing,
    were India bound
    and there the pair found
    much more than a casual browsing,

    for poetry here lasted pages;
    to read it would take many ages.
    It’s epic, you see,
    a form which can be
    best treasured by those who are sages.

    This wouldn’t appeal to a zoner,
    (unless a poetical loner).
    For writing this style
    takes years (a LONG while)
    and likely elicits a moaner.

    There’s probably more to their story
    (with details of conquest and glory)
    but I think it’s fair
    (is anyone there?)
    to drag it on some other lorry.

    So now let me send them a packing,
    their influence here never lacking.
    They plopped down the word
    to make themselves heard.
    There’s naught else that we should find lacking.

    Perhaps someday (long from this telling)
    they’ll make new appearance compelling
    each poet and bard
    to work extra hard
    until then – this nonsense I’m quelling.

    You’re kind to have read to this ending.
    Perhaps if amusement portending,
    this wrought you a smile
    (then all was worthwhile)
    accept please, my gratitude sending




  • #2
    I am rolling in laughter, full of delight, every word a poet's delight. No labor needed just fanciful and fun. I see many influences here without taking any thing away from the poet extraordinaire. Love,love,love.

    Comment


    • RhymeLovingWriter
      RhymeLovingWriter commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you so much Bobby - that WAS the intent! The zone has had a good effect on me.

  • #3
    You certainly know how to keep the ball rolling, narrative-wise, Rhymist. My favourite bit concerns the waka.

    Comment


    • RhymeLovingWriter
      RhymeLovingWriter commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you for the indulgence Grant. Yes, that was both MHenry's influence and the shortness of syllable which allowed for rhyme. A few more of these and I think I'll have a book ready to go.

  • #4
    this Friday. (only really a day a-way).

    what will you be drinking, or will there be brisquet, and hot stinky slatherings of that white mushy stuff, called ... good with just a dash to make ya squint? whatever its called... I forget.

    Comment


    • RhymeLovingWriter
      RhymeLovingWriter commented
      Editing a comment
      I actually don't drink much - even on St. Patrick's day.

      Though Bailey's on ice would taste rather nice
      I may just imbibe to honor the tribe
      And as for corn beef and cabbage to dine
      It's take it or leave it for me - both are fine

      Are you thinking of horseradish? When well made that stuff is delicious!

  • #5
    I AM amazed, too. n thanks for the tip; waka,waka.

    Comment


    • RhymeLovingWriter
      RhymeLovingWriter commented
      Editing a comment
      No problem - the tanka is one form I still haven't attempted much.

  • #6
    A fun continuation of the story in limericks, RLW!

    Comment


    • RhymeLovingWriter
      RhymeLovingWriter commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks Muttado1sb. You've been here since the beginning, haven't you?

    • Muttado1sb
      Muttado1sb commented
      Editing a comment
      I joined right around then. I was a bit quieter, though. :-)

  • #7
    Hello RhymeLovingWriter, Well, I did sprightly dance through this without trip or falter. An unhindered flow of gleeful poetics in fitting rhyme and solid composition. Very well done indeed. A complete joy to read. The corn beef should be corned to perfection and the cabbage, curly - spuds served in their jackets - ha ha! Happy Paddy's Day, Tony.

    Comment


    • RhymeLovingWriter
      RhymeLovingWriter commented
      Editing a comment
      Many thanks - I'm looking forward to it!

  • #8
    What a delightful, rollicking ride over the waves of poetry! And with whom better to travel than the fearless piratical muse Malcolm and his partner? I devoured the first two ballads, and basked in the mirthful eloquence of the last (however, I trust it will not long remain so!).

    And thank you for introducing me to the ballata -- I tried it out, and posted the result. I've always considered myself as being bitten by an ancient bug.

    Comment


    • RhymeLovingWriter
      RhymeLovingWriter commented
      Editing a comment
      Yea! I appreciate your enjoyment immensely and am heading to read your ballata (which I have yet to attempt) now. Bravissima NYS!

  • #9
    If I was capable of this I would write nothing else. Pure entertainment on time for the holiday. Your pen has the same gift of gab that makes the whole world want to be Irish.

    Comment


    • RhymeLovingWriter
      RhymeLovingWriter commented
      Editing a comment
      Oh thank you LG - this comment warms my heart! Perhaps I DO have some Irish blood flowing through these veins. I'll have to recheck the family tree.

  • #10
    maybe those love
    that were our Elders
    secret - favorite
    to shift -
    frog wet tasting shade.

    I love tanka! I have written close to 150, with various successes. here's to happiness n profundity.

    Comment


    • RhymeLovingWriter
      RhymeLovingWriter commented
      Editing a comment
      Wonderful amenOra! I have yet to attempt tanka. You should start posting them a few at a time for all to enjoy!

  • #11
    Loved this RLW. I'm going to read the others. Had me laughing and wanting more.

    Comment


    • RhymeLovingWriter
      RhymeLovingWriter commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you, kind lady, that was the intent. I feel Malcolm and Penelope aren't quite finished with me yet, but as it's usually months between visits, it may be awhile for another installment! I used these on my blog this past week when I was featuring limericks in the days leading up to St. Patrick's day. You can check it out at rhymelovingwriter.com (I'd imbed the link but the comment section doesn't give access to those formatting tools, only original comments) if you'd like. Thank you again for the look and like - but mostly the laughter!
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