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  • Goblin shoes

    Deleted
    Last edited by grant hayes; 12-20-2017, 05:29 PM.

  • #2
    If I was asked if I knew what each of these words meant in isolation I believe I could provide a reasonable definition; if I am asked what they mean when strung together in the totality of this poem, I give up in ignorance. My ignorance increases day by day.

    Comment


    • grant hayes
      grant hayes commented
      Editing a comment
      I daresay you are not alone, in this regard. That I fail routinely to communicate is not news; nevertheless your reiteration of this deficiency will gratify many, I am sure.

  • #3
    Grant I too don't know what this means but it does seem to have a message. A collection of strong statements -shuffling in goblin shoes to mend the wear for example could have several meanings depending on your defintion of of goblin. Shouting wolf to the fold - are we talking about you or someone else? I would guess at someone else?This strikes me as a ridde that is to be decoded. Shouting wolf -seeking attention from the fold -the zone- working spells from lust and inertia- writing poems spurred on by available time and strong feelings.-or or firming decisions that keep silent- deciding notto explain- but shuffling in goblin shoes to mend the wear- goblins are magical yet usually maligned -so are you trying to mend something in the backgroundwithout the good being public viewing- abominating praise- negative feedback received that you are thinking about- Do I make any senses only you know? E xplain if you wish but if not I am still satisfied as no explanation in this case is also an answer to your intent. I have engaged more to each wordthan any other recent poem so kudos to you for that. So magician either revealyour tricks or keep the mystery you choose.

    Comment


    • #4
      Ps Grant your piece has been influential in helping me finish a piece I was stuck on called we won't wait a piece for this years Parkinsons awareness so my thanks to you.

      Comment


      • grant hayes
        grant hayes commented
        Editing a comment
        If I have catalysed that completion, then I am most gladdened, Parkinsonspoet.

    • #5
      Parkinsonspoet, the poem presents three choices, bracketed within the first and last lines:
      'The question of' - A, or B, or C - 'I consider'.

      The alternative courses of action are:
      A) 'shouting wolf to the fold' - actively raising the alarm about a danger.
      B) 'working spells from lust and inertia' - possibly the process of making poems, or other diversionary or creative pursuits.
      C) 'firming decisions that keep silence' - resolving to keep one's 'head down'.

      Choice C) is further characterised as 'shuffling in goblin shoes to mend the wear'. I had in mind a kind of faerie tale image of quiet, almost imperceptible activity, trying to tread lightly, but perhaps failing. The 'wear' suggests the wearing out of material things.

      So, in other words, your own interpretation of the poem offered above is pretty much spot on. As usual, you have read perceptively.

      I was influenced to write in this way by some contemporary poems I've been reading. I originally placed the second lines of each stanza further to the right, beginning below where their preceding line ends. However, I was unable to retain this format when I posted the poem here.

      Thank you for taking the time to share your own reading of the poem, Parkinsonspoet!

      Comment


      • #6
        Oh, I forgot to explain 'abominating praise'. That has to do with the notion expessed in certain faerie tales that thanking or praising supernatural helpers makes them flee. It goes with the territory when one shuffles in goblin shoes.

        Comment


        • Parkinsonspoet
          Parkinsonspoet commented
          Editing a comment
          Grant thank you for your explanations.Your poem did help me but not as an infuence but taking it apart helped me clarify my intentions for my own.

      • #7
        praise as mere as blame,
        and blame as dear as praise.

        know who said that? no googling, unless you have to, guys. lol ;p

        Comment


        • grant hayes
          grant hayes commented
          Editing a comment
          Ah, Dickinson, I see, amenOra. I do not know her as well as I ought. Fine line, aptly quoted.

        • amenOra
          amenOra commented
          Editing a comment
          yup, but you knew well enough to recognize the line, and logic, so aptly hers. (probably).. i havent read enough of her either; though there is the romantic story, i found her yellowed book in some garbage, and what Gold that was, i shall never forget her Beauty.

          and im always down to discuss.

          she liked science, and Mr. (i forget his name)... the one who wrote about each new truth is a magazine in the weapon of power or something.

          roughly speaking..
          Last edited by amenOra; 03-10-2017, 03:24 PM.

      • #8
        grant hayes , you could achieve your desired formatting whether through wrapping [CODE] tags around the text (# button in the text editor) and then adding whitespace as necessary – but then the text is formatted as monospace, which may not be desired. OR you could use "Increase/decrease indent" buttons, found in the same button group where numbered lists and bulletins are. (P.S. these options are found in advanced editor, which appears when you press "A" button, next to the smileys button).

        And thank you for the comments about your poem's meaning – if Tanner failed to decipher it, I would not even try!

        Code:
        The question of shouting
                              wolf to the fold
        
        or working spells from lust
                                 and inertia
        
        or firming decisions
                          that keep silence
        
        shuffling in goblin shoes
                               to mend the wear
        
        abominating praise
                        I consider
        The question of shouting
        wolf to the fold


        or working spells from lust
        and inertia


        or firming decisions
        that keep silence


        shuffling in goblin shoes
        to mend the wear


        abominating praise
        I consider

        Comment


        • grant hayes
          grant hayes commented
          Editing a comment
          Many thanks, Anatoliy. I don't know if the formatting makes the piece more understandable. This was an experiment in a less tightly rhythmic and device-full structure than is typical for me.

      • #9
        Grant, I greatly appreciate your gloss and the commentaries of all above. When I got my faculties back again, I realize what this poem reminded me of. I trust you know the author of the "The Red Wheelbarrow" and the many interpretations it has engendered.

        so much depends
        upon

        a red wheel
        barrow

        glazed with rain
        water

        beside the white
        chickens.

        I think you poem is actually a fierce wolf in benign sheep's clothing; written in direct and (for you) relatively simple language. but is definitely a maze of deep ambiguity depending on how the phrases are read and interpreted.

        I might like the poem better with the removal of "abominating praise" and ending with I consider, which from my perspective, jerks the reader to realizing that having been lulled by the unique phrasing of this poem, he/she must go back and focus on what is being considered. I link your "I consider" to W.C. Williams "so much depends/upon" - Just some Tanner thoughts on a very cold and windy day here in Eastern Canada

        Comment


        • #10
          Tanner, I hear you about 'abominating praise' and am considering whether it might better be left out, or perhaps replaced. Actually 'abominating' is quite an uncharacteristic word for me, due to its high syllable count and prescriptive scope. Thank you for querying that line.

          I have not encountered 'The Red Wheelbarrow' before, and I thank you for bringing it to my attention. It is quite a gem to turn over and over!

          Comment


          • #11
            Harlem
            BY Langston Hughes

            What happens to a dream deferred?


            Does it dry up
            like a raisin in the sun?
            Or fester like a sore—
            And then run?
            Does it stink like rotten meat?
            Or crust and sugar over—
            like a syrupy sweet?

            Maybe it just sags
            like a heavy load.


            Or does it explode?

            Comment


            • grant hayes
              grant hayes commented
              Editing a comment
              Clearly, the real deal. Beautiful poem.

          • #12
            Wonderful! I am pleased to read poetry that considers interaction. Goblin shoes a perfect image!

            Comment


            • #13
              It is good to have options, at any rate. The title did intrigue!

              Comment


              • #14


                Goblin shoes

                Who shouts Wolf
                To the flock

                Or works spells
                From lust

                To quiet the inertia
                Of dust

                Or frets about the
                Blood-letting

                As Silence shuffles
                About wearing

                Goblin shoes
                The worst

                Of all outcomes
                I consider



                Please excuse me, Grant, in this indulgence. Tanner decided to play around with your poem.

                Comment


                • grant hayes
                  grant hayes commented
                  Editing a comment
                  You have rearranged the sticks and pebbles and worked quite the transmogrification, Tanner. You seem to turn the gaze of the poet from inward to outward, although the 'Who' at the start could also be, implicitly, the poet.

                  In any case, you turn the series of options considered into attributes of this Who: who shouts, who works, who frets; whereas I use subject-less gerunds that keep the focus on the actions themselves: shouting, working, firming. And at the start, you make the pronoun Who bear the implicit query that underlies the whole poem, whereas I state it it baldly 'the question of'. You consider identity, I consider actions. Interesting contrast.

                  'worst of all outcomes' is too prescriptive in my view, and 'outcomes' itself is a dousing, administrative, flat term, more suited to a business prospectus.

                • grant hayes
                  grant hayes commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Another thing: I noticed you've made the lines more free in form. I don't know whether you noticed, but I used a syllable count of 6-4 for each couplet. In a brief piece like this, I like to keep count, as it were, like in a haiku. That's not to say the free form isn't effective; just thought I'd point out the difference for those who are interested.

                • AnatoliyS
                  AnatoliyS commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Final difference: you can actually understand what Tanner 's version is about. I find threads like this most interesting, one can learn so much from all the comments! Thank you Tanner for another take on this poem, and Grant for even further analysis in your comment.

              • #15
                grant hayes loving this and after reading all of the comments i am a bit overwhelmed to post my own comment. I usually choose not to read what others comment until I come up with my own appraisal. Now i am reminded why ! I will come back and read again... fresh clear mind after a walk in the sun in my goblin shoes.

                Comment

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