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Christ among the doctors

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  • Christ among the doctors

    Deleted
    Last edited by grant hayes; 12-25-2017, 08:25 PM.

  • #2
    Ekphrastic

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    • #3
      its breath of skulls
      on a word's new skin
      .

      I love that!

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      • grant hayes
        grant hayes commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks, Dwayne!

      • pipersfancy
        pipersfancy commented
        Editing a comment
        Me too! Great line!

    • #4
      Your words made me cry!

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      • grant hayes
        grant hayes commented
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        Cry in a good way, I hope, lunar glide!

    • #5
      Thank you Grant. I was going to go looking for examples when I heard this word from MHenry the other day - and here you have provided a wonderful and beautiful specimen for study! The definition or description of 'Ekphrastic' that I read said that the written part is often rhetorical and symbolic. Those seem like contradictory terms to me, yet I understood your poem fairly well.

      I find this a beautiful piece. Thank you again. I'm feeling today especially that my little brain needs so much illumination (trying to work out some formatting on my web page - not my forte).

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      • grant hayes
        grant hayes commented
        Editing a comment
        If the piece has conveyed beauty to you, Rhymist, then it has succeeded.

    • #6
      Grant, the art first drew me in and your words kept me there. I could not, did not want to get out. I have read this now many times over. I had to look up Ekprastic (another one from my countrymen) and was taken to a site you might want to explore: http://www.rattle.com/ekphrastic/
      Magnificent work here grant hayes


      little destined lion
      palps the pilfered air


      loving this^^^

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      • grant hayes
        grant hayes commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes, some very accomplished poems on Rattle, Suz-zen. One is humbled by the work featured there.

        Dürer's painting nudges my burbling barely clear of bagatelle.

    • #7
      Grant I love this thelanguageof this is exquisate its breath of skulls evoking the decay signaling why the Christ was needed. I have a problem in that I don't see Christ as a lion, lamb yes but too obvious , lyric yes possibly as word of god but i would use something different here. Is there a particular reason you used lion?

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      • grant hayes
        grant hayes commented
        Editing a comment
        The lion was the symbol of the tribe of Judah.

        In Revelation 5:5, the eschatological Christ is referred to thus:

        "and one of the elders said to me, "Stop weeping; behold, the Lion that is from the tribe of Judah, the Root of David, has overcome so as to open the book and its seven seals." "

      • Parkinsonspoet
        Parkinsonspoet commented
        Editing a comment
        thank you that makes perfect sense

    • #8
      Lion of Judah

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      • #9
        Hello grant, A beautiful religious icon in poetry. Your language gives the scene a three dimensional feel. A most enjoyable verse to read and dwell a while. Lovely poetry. Regards, Tony.

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        • #10
          Religious poetry from an irreligious dolt, Tony. Any beauty is brought by the reader.

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          • The second
            The second commented
            Editing a comment
            Grant Thank You! I will read the scriptures again!

        • #11
          I have had to spend some time with this verse. So much packed into such a small space.
          the first mystery for me is line three "palps the pilfered air". i will asume that it is the christ who is touching, verbally caressing the pilfered air. I am not sure who claims the air and who is pilfering it. I suppose that would be a matter of perspective. Whose air is it anyway?

          If I recall the story, at this juncture the christ found himself among the religious leaders and great thinkers of his day. He apparently engaged them in conversation. He also seemed to exhibit a remarkable knowledge and understanding of "things" religious. Your poem then seems to suggest that these leaders attempted to begin to mold his understanding to fit thiers.

          I love your use of "on a word's new skin". It seems prophetic. He, the christ, would bring new understanding to old thoughts and take the title of "The Word Made Flesh".

          Great fun to study

          thanks

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          • #12
            rhymetime, thank you for sharing your encounter with this poem in such thoughtful detail!

            That you ponder who claims the air is the right response. Who, indeed? I had in mind the idea of air as the province of the cosmic enemy - the aerial archon - in Ephesians 2:2, but also the feminine, mothering presence of the Breath - the Spirit.

            Your understanding of the setting and the 'word's new skin' are both spot on. It's a pleasure to be read so insightfully ; many thanks for taking the time.

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