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Love Thy Neighbor

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  • Love Thy Neighbor

    Love Thy Neighbor
    (Sonnet IV - Italian/Petrachan)

    I have no gold to offer you my friend
    But what I have is rendered true indeed
    It comes on scene with hope before your need
    To meet with new beginning losses’ end

    Across the miles or near to home we send
    Without a string or chord to bind the deed
    Each little thing with prayer to plant a seed
    And ease the burden which does now offend

    Beyond disaster strike, when all seems lost,
    Should stranger’s hand as willingly out-reach
    As kith and kin with proximate appeal?
    How could a stranger abrogate the cost
    Which over span of latitude was leached?
    Unless, of course, with heart of Love’s own zeal.



    ©RhymeLovingWriter 2016

    The basic meter of all sonnets in English is iambic pentameter (string of 5 feet with da-DA pattern) although there have been a few tetrameter and even hexameter sonnets, as well.

    The Italian sonnet is divided into two sections by two different groups of rhyming sounds. The first 8 lines is called the octave and rhymes:

    a b b a a b b a
    The remaining 6 lines is called the sestet and can have either two or three rhyming sounds, arranged in a variety of ways:

    c d c d c d
    c d d c d c
    c d e c d e
    c d e c e d
    c d c e d c

    There is a volta, or turn, traditionally on line 9. (This is still the most difficult part for me.)


  • #2
    This is wonderful, RLW. It flows well,the rhymes are tight, and the message is clear and meaningful.

    Comment


    • RhymeLovingWriter
      RhymeLovingWriter
      Administrator
      RhymeLovingWriter commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you MHenry. I've been watching the news coverage of floods in Louisiana, and have a home school friend who is from there and knows many affected. There are so many ways we can recognize the sufferings of others and lend a hand.

  • #3
    this is so impressive! always amazed by your creations

    Comment


    • RhymeLovingWriter
      RhymeLovingWriter
      Administrator
      RhymeLovingWriter commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you LG. It didn't start out as a sonnet, but I would like to learn about and work more with this form, trying to update the language. Most sonnets I've read speak of love (this does - just philia instead of eros) and sound Elizabethan to my ear. The starting phrases let themselves be manipulated into this - words can be accommodating at times.

  • #4
    Eloquent truths, poetically rendered.

    Excellent!

    Comment


  • #5
    Stretching your wings and flying on this one RLW! Well done!!

    Comment


    • RhymeLovingWriter
      RhymeLovingWriter
      Administrator
      RhymeLovingWriter commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you so much Alex. The sonnet form continues to intrigue and challenge me, so I continue to practice!
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