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A Glove

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  • A Glove


    I take that road, the pond along,
    That sings so wondrous the wanderer's song.
    Two tracks of pebbles pressed in clay,
    Where once passed naught but horse and dray.
    Away, away! the pond aside,
    From broadcast scenes not to abide.
    Upon pond water shine stripes of dust
    In lengthy lines of things I must
    And must not — the is and the aught
    Of actions considered and careless thought.
    Though overwrought it's strong I stride,
    To where, to when, to turn, decide!
    On heel and sole, on knee and thigh,
    By mind and soul, by searching eye
    To where grow six pair of iris blue
    From where two pair of teal ducks flew
    Across the lane, then o'er the grass,
    Where it has lain alone, alas! —
    A single glove, revealed of snow,
    That some left hand and ring would know.
    And grow 'tween fingers stalk and seed;
    A field not mowed and now in need.
    Till will that thing, brown stitch and stuff,
    By blades ruff edge to shred and fluff
    Be churned to thatch, ground into ground —
    What was little sought and never found
    Are those I've taught, from whom I've learned
    And then left lay and n'er returned.
    Till that mad day, self-judged as friend ,
    To as lawyers may, my life defend.

  • #2
    Closely observed nature is the setting for a solitary journey, narrowing focus to an abandoned manmade thing - a glove. Anticipation of the glove's absorption into nature becomes the catalyst for a meditation on people lost to the poet who have been similarly absorbed. There is anticipation of a personal judgement - enigmatic, hearfelt - at the end. This is a moving walk along the pondside, John; your words immersed me in both the outer world around the poet and his inner world of reflective melancholy.

    Comment


    • #3
      For me, this is reminiscent of Frost's {Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening}. Each line, verse, and stanza better than it predecessor! Bravo my poet friend!!

      Comment


      • DWAYNE
        DWAYNE commented
        Editing a comment
        I had the same notion!

        This is vivid imagery, well conveyed.

      • John Wertz
        John Wertz commented
        Editing a comment
        Hi Dwayne, Yes, the lost glove image is, I think, always poignant -- something to do with childhood maybe. I would love to read your take on it.

    • #4
      I love all your writings! You do a fantastic job and I never know what to say. So many others express it way better than me so I will say excellent, another delightful poem!

      Comment


      • John Wertz
        John Wertz commented
        Editing a comment
        Hi Rach, I so appreciate you interest. I love you writing as well.

    • #5
      Thanks friends. Question: I was wondering about the number of internal rhymes along with the end rhymes. Did anyone think it was too much or tedious?

      Comment


      • Guest's Avatar
        Guest commented
        Editing a comment
        I thought the flow of it was very nice and I love poems with end Rhymes they are my favorite. I didn't feel it tedious at all in my opinion

      • grant hayes
        grant hayes commented
        Editing a comment
        I may be alone here, but bring on the internal rhyme!!

    • #6
      I absolutely love the introspective nature of this piece. I found it beautiful - and every rhyme naturally placed and purposefully fit - neither too much nor tedious. Masterful in reflection John! Thank you!

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      • #7
        I'm in complete agreement with Rach79 on this one John !

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        • #8
          I love the rhyming sequence.

          Very effective.

          Comment


          • #9
            Hi, John, You have a weaved a wonderful tale focused on a glove in the midst of a nature walk, and you have incorporated nature into the glove, in a sense, making the glove one with nature, as are you the pond-walker. The internal rhymes and the ending rhymes are the pebbles of your poem, and we walk them with you willingly to see where on Earth they will take us. Two gloved thumbs up!

            Comment


            • John Wertz
              John Wertz commented
              Editing a comment
              Hi MHenry, Glad you liked the rhyming here. I had not shown to anyone, and wondered how people might take to it.
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