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My Autistic son

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  • My Autistic son

    My Autistic Son


    Flap your hands my little bird, fly
    Fly into the bright blue sky
    Build your nest little bird, try
    Be independent before I die
    Flap your hands my little bird, fly.



  • #2
    One of my boys was born with autism. A characteristic associated with autism is hand flapping which is referred to as a form of stimming. Sometimes they get overstimulated and this helps them calm down. He now is in college and had done really well.

    Comment


    • RhymeLovingWriter
      RhymeLovingWriter commented
      Editing a comment
      I saw this comment after I'd posted. Wonderful for him - and for you!

    • Sumyanna
      Sumyanna commented
      Editing a comment
      Oh so sweet. So glad you were there begging him to fly. You made a huge difference.

  • #3
    Ah, cc springer - I've no idea where he is on the spectrum - but this is definitely a beautiful verse telling of the wishes a parent has for his/her independence-challenged child. It speaks love and encouragement and is beautiful! Thank you for posting it!

    Comment


    • cc springer
      cc springer commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks very much. He had a long road but has done so well. I've learned so much from him.

  • #4
    You said so much, with so few words.

    Comment


    • cc springer
      cc springer commented
      Editing a comment
      a nice compliment from someone that knows how to use words. Thank you.

  • #5
    Beautiful heartfelt poem. Thanks for sharing :-)

    Comment


    • cc springer
      cc springer commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you. I know what it meant to me but really didn't know what it would mean to someone reading it. Very nice.

  • #6
    CC, you've got it all in perfect perspective. Yes, I'm sure you've learned many lessons. Thanks for sharing.

    Comment


    • cc springer
      cc springer commented
      Editing a comment
      Bobby. It's good to see you posting again. You learn so much from something like this. So much responsibility too. Thanks for reading and posting your comments.

  • #7
    This grabbed my heart and accolades to you for inspiring him to fly. It takes a lot of hard work and love. I'm very happy for him. RLW said it perfectly that every mother and father wants the best for the children to fly, be independent and fine without them. It made me tear up. :-).

    Comment


    • cc springer
      cc springer commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks Alex... I wanted to post it last month for autism awareness month but it wasn't easy to post. It's been quite a road from getting no response from him, being non-verbal, to the young man he is today. It's really taken a community to raise him.

  • #8
    CC one of the hardest things is to watch youur child step into the world-one of the most beautiful to see them fly. my best wishes to you both

    Comment


    • cc springer
      cc springer commented
      Editing a comment
      Hi Poet. it's been a lot of work. He is a good example of how being positive can make a difference. As you have been.

  • #9
    cc springer this is simply beautiful in its simplicity - testimony to a whole world of love, adversity, and hope.

    Comment


    • cc springer
      cc springer commented
      Editing a comment
      thank you very much. I like that... a testimony to a whole world of love, adversity, and hope.

  • #10
    Awesome! What an amazing tribute to your son! So beautifully written. I bet it would touch a lot of hearts for the autism awareness! You did a great job very touching!

    Comment


    • cc springer
      cc springer commented
      Editing a comment
      I would be happy if that was the result...more understanding in the world. Thanks Rach for reading and the compliment.

  • #11
    After I read your beautiful verse, and your comment, I went here

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqTBbXLb32M

    and got a first hand look at stimming.

    This helped me see greater meaning and poignancy in your extraordinary poem, which was wonderful even without the image.

    It actually looks like the child is trying to fly -- tragic and disturbing, but inexplicably beautiful, as well.

    Comment


    • cc springer
      cc springer commented
      Editing a comment
      Mhenry - thanks for posting. I went and looked at the video as well. My son is high functioning as the boy in the video. His senses just seemed to be more sensitive than everyone. He wouldn't eat because I think he was supersensitive to food taste - we thought that he would starve. He wouldn't wear certain clothing because of skin sensitivity - never long pants and we had to cut off all the labels. He could hear sounds that other people could not and if there was too much noise, he would try to get out of the location. He didn't start talking until 2nd grade when a amazing teacher made a connection with him using PECS - picture exchange system which used a combination of pictures with words and we found out he was a visual thinker. Some famous people are thought to have been on the autism spectrum - Einstein (a visual thinker), Mozart, Issac newton, and others. Anyway, with my son stimming just seemed to help calm him. The hypersensitivity seems to have abated.
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